Go/no-go date looms this week for KanCare

Top welfare officials from the administration of Gov. Sam Brownback during an April press conference about the state's 1115 waiver application. From left: Dr. Robert Moser, secretary of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment; Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer, also a physician; and Dr. Susan Mosier, state Medicaid director.

Top welfare officials from the administration of Gov. Sam Brownback during an April press conference about the state's 1115 waiver application. From left: Dr. Robert Moser, secretary of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment; Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer, also a physician; and Dr. Susan Mosier, state Medicaid director. by Phil Cauthon

By the end of this week, officials in the administration of Gov. Sam Brownback are expected to decide if their KanCare Medicaid reforms will move forward on the original timeline of a Jan. 1 launch or whether the program will get pushed to a later, yet-to-be-decided date.

A few things are scheduled to happen over the course of the next five days that will shape that decision, according to Brownback officials. Among them:

Sometime this week, perhaps by Wednesday, completion of the last of the state’s “readiness reviews” of the three managed care companies is due.

Officials have said they will not proceed on schedule unless Amerigroup, United Healthcare and Sunflower State Health Plan, a Centene subsidiary, each has demonstrated it is ready. (The companies had an Oct. 12 deadline for demonstrating that their networks of hospitals, doctors and other service providers were “90 percent adequate,” but administration officials said they wouldn’t make public the status of the companies’ respective network capacities until the end of this week, so it isn’t yet clear how well each company fared with the deadline.)

On Thursday, the day before the administration’s go/no-go decision date, top Kansas health officials are set to meet in Baltimore, Md., with federal officials from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Office of Management and Budget and others.

Reviewing the waiver request

The purpose of the meeting is a review of the state’s so-called Section 1115 waiver application. Much, if not most, of the KanCare plan requires federal approval, either as part of the waiver application, the state’s ongoing Medicaid plan on file with federal officials, or the KanCare contracts and rates. The federal government gets a large say in keeping with the fact that it pays more than half the state’s annual Medicaid costs, which next year are expected to reach $3.2 billion.

Though administration officials have said the launch date for KanCare is contingent upon the various factors still in play as of this week, at the same time they’ve made clear to legislators and others that they have no major fallback plans in place in the event the program is delayed.

“With all those caveats and decision points along the way, we're marching forward for Jan. 1 and all our efforts are for implementation on Jan. 1,” Bruffett told members of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee last week during an update on the KanCare program.

For example, KanCare is expected to supersede HealthWave, the state’s program for providing government subsidized health coverage to children and pregnant women from low- and moderate-income homes. The state’s contracts with the current HealthWave managed care companies, Unicare and Children’s Mercy Family Health Partners (recently purchased by Coventry Health Care), are due to expire Dec. 31. There is no plan to extend those contracts in the event KanCare is delayed.

“We’ve not had any of those kinds of conversations,” Bruffett told KHI News Service.

If necessary, Kansas could continue HealthWave services with the more expensive alternative of paying fees for services instead of relying on managed care contractors, “but that isn’t a good option,” Bruffett said.

As much KanCare as possible

When asked by Sen. Laura Kelly, a Topeka Democrat who serves on the budget committee, what administration officials would do if federal officials do not approve the 1115 waiver on the Brownback timeline, Bruffett said the administration’s intention was to launch as much of KanCare as possible without federal approvals on Jan. 1.

“Everything we have authority to do in the KanCare model, we will do,” she said.

But at this point, it isn’t clear how much of the program could be initiated without the OK from the feds.

Continue reading on khi.org/kancare-deadlines.

Tagged: Plan, waiver, medicaid, deadline, Health, brownback, Sunflower, United, kancare, Healthcare, Amerigroup, 1115, kansas

Comments

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years ago

“Everything we have authority to do in the KanCare model, we will do,” she said.

Translation-- we have no plan-- we don't really care if this program works or not, so we're just winging it.

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