KanCare pilot project launched but opposition to DD "carve-in" persists

During the 2012 session, a bipartisan group of representatives and senators introduced a resolution attempting to delay the Jan. 1, 2013 launch of KanCare. The resolution failed, but lawmakers succeeded in persuading the Brownback administration to hold off a year on including in the program long-term services for the developmentally disabled. DD advocates say they will ask this year's Legislature to extend or make permanent that temporary "carve-out." Given the large numbers of new legislators following the 2012 elections and the administration's push to expand KanCare, it remains to be seen what will happen. Of the eight legislators shown in this file photo, only three are still serving.

During the 2012 session, a bipartisan group of representatives and senators introduced a resolution attempting to delay the Jan. 1, 2013 launch of KanCare. The resolution failed, but lawmakers succeeded in persuading the Brownback administration to hold off a year on including in the program long-term services for the developmentally disabled. DD advocates say they will ask this year's Legislature to extend or make permanent that temporary "carve-out." Given the large numbers of new legislators following the 2012 elections and the administration's push to expand KanCare, it remains to be seen what will happen. Of the eight legislators shown in this file photo, only three are still serving. by Phil Cauthon

After months of advisory committee haggling over what it should look like, state officials say they are ready to launch the pilot program that will pave the way for including long-term services for the developmentally disabled in the new KanCare program.

Now, all they need to start the pilot are participants.

A recruiting letter went out Friday, seeking organizations and individuals willing to volunteer, but representatives from the state’s developmental disability organizations said doubts remain strong among their members about the pilot in particular and KanCare in general. It seems that nobody, including administration officials, expects a throng of eager participants.

“The advisory committee talked about really wanting, hoping to have a broad representation of providers (in the pilot), including different types of providers,” said Shawn Sullivan, secretary of the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services. “I don't know that it’s necessarily as important to have numbers as it is to have different types. I’m hoping to have five providers, at least.”

The administration of Gov. Sam Brownback originally sought to have long-term services for the developmentally disabled included in KanCare when the managed-care program was launched Jan. 1. But groups, including parents, that represent the developmentally disabled, persuaded legislators to postpone that for a year.

KanCare is the governor’s ongoing remake of the state Medicaid program. Since it was launched a few weeks ago, virtually all the state’s 380,000 Medicaid enrollees have been assigned to health plans run by three commercial insurance companies.

The same legislative proviso that delayed the administration’s push to roll long-term developmental disability services into KanCare also called for the pilot program. But disagreement between the administration and advocates for the disabled over what the pilot should try to gauge or accomplish went on for months after the 2012 Legislature adjourned and still hasn’t been fully resolved.

What kind of pilot?

Advocates for the developmentally disabled said they wanted a pilot that would test the administration’s still-unproven theory that the KanCare insurance companies could effectively manage long-term or “non-medical” developmental disability services, producing healthier customers while cutting government costs yet presumably earning profits.

That ambitious set of pledges is something that hasn’t been solidly demonstrated anywhere in the country and sounds “too good to be true,” as Maury Thompson, former director of Johnson County Developmental Supports.

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Tagged: medicaid, developmentally, brownback, carve, out, kansas, dd, aging, kancare, disabled, services

Comments

63BC 1 year, 8 months ago

Pretty tacky picture.

Five of these Legislators aren't serving any more.

One tragically died.

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