State, local health departments urge Kansans to test for radon in homes

Richard Ziesenis, director of Environmental Health at the Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department, urges residents to test their homes for radon. In this file photo, Ziesenis is testing a home's water system.

Richard Ziesenis, director of Environmental Health at the Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department, urges residents to test their homes for radon. In this file photo, Ziesenis is testing a home's water system. by Karrey Britt

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. For non-smokers, it is the first.

January is “Kansas Radon Action Month” to help educate Kansans about the dangers of radon exposure and encourage actions to identify and address radon problems in the home.

Radon is a naturally occurring gas that is released from the decay of uranium in the soil. When radon enters homes it accumulates and can cause serious health problems, such as an increased risk of lung cancer.

“Kansans should test their homes, address any elevated radon levels and use radon resistant construction techniques when building new homes.”

— Dr. Robert Moser, state health officer and secretary for the Kansas Department of Health and Environment

uploaded

uploaded by Karrey Britt

About 1 out of every 3 radon measurements performed in Kansas are elevated, being above 4 pCi/l (picoCuries per liter). Some areas have higher levels than others, though elevated levels of radon have been detected in EVERY county in the state.

In Douglas County, 1 out of every 3 homes tested for radon were higher than the EPA limit, said Richard Ziesenis, director of Environmental Health at the Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department. ”This is approximately 500 homes out of 1,500 homes tested, so it is clear that we do have high levels of radon in Douglas County and it is highly recommended that all Douglas County homes be tested,” he said.

Inexpensive radon test kits — available at local hardware and builder’s supply stores and at your Kansas county extension office — can reveal the amount of radon in any building. The test kits are available at K-State Research and Extension — Douglas County, 2110 Harper St. The kits cost $5 and are easy to use. For more information about purchasing a kit, call the Extension office at 785-843-7058.

Homes with high levels of radon can usually be fixed with simple and affordable venting techniques. Homeowners should talk with a certified radon contractor if levels above 4 pCi/l are detected.

A list of certified radon contractors is available by calling the Kansas Radon Hotline at 800-693-KDHE (800-693-5343).

Comments

Ron Holzwarth 1 year, 3 months ago

This is a reposting from September 21, 2012:

I knew a United Methodist minister that died of lung cancer in 1986, and he never smoked a single cigarette in his whole life. And, he lived in the parsonage for decades. I had suspected that radon had been the cause of his lung cancer long ago.

Here's a list: The United Methodist parsonages in Atchison, Shawnee Mission, and Lebo, Kansas all need to be checked for radon as soon as possible. I hope that someone can make sure that gets done.

0

mikekt 1 year, 3 months ago

Some......, not all .....granite counter tops, can also emit radon gases.......some kitchens have really high ( 25 X the normal too high to levels ) readings, that might not show up in an unfinished basement area canister type test because the radioactive source is in the finished space kitchen counters, where the family spends time .

So, what is the obvious as to where one should also be testing if one has granite counter tops in a kitchen or bath, as well as a basement ?

Radon can also enter into Poured Slab-On-Grade-No-Basement Houses, Businesses, Etc..

This is "buyer-beware time" because the state is not going to legislate that you be protected from buying your own cause of death That would be ....."BAD"....for business !!!

0

Commenting has been disabled for this item.