Bye-bye bounty: Kale chips! (Yeah, that's right, I said KALE)

Yum! Kale chips make the perfect side to an avocado and heirloom tomato sandwich on local bread.

Yum! Kale chips make the perfect side to an avocado and heirloom tomato sandwich on local bread. by Sarah Henning

You may have checked out the headline to this post and thought, "KALE chips? CHIPS? How chip-like can kale get?"

Well, to answer your question, they won't rival Doritos, but they do taste pretty darn good. That, and they're super easy. All you have to do is put them on a cookie sheet covered in parchment paper (NOT waxed paper), spray them with olive oil, sprinkle with a bit of salt and sugar and bake for 10 minutes, or until crisped but not burnt.

The chef lays down torn bits of kale on parchment paper to create "kale chips."

The chef lays down torn bits of kale on parchment paper to create "kale chips." by Sarah Henning

I love them and I've gotten other people to love them (Kids! Husbands! People who've never had kale!). So, now it's your turn.

To refresh your memory, I did get more than kale in last week's bag. In addition to the bunch of curly green kale, I got blueberries, blackberries, shallots, basil and little baby yellow squashes.

The berries — both kinds — didn't make it until sundown Monday, they were just too good to sit around.

We used the kale on Tuesday, pairing them with sandwiches made of avocado and local Purple Cherokee heirloom tomatoes on local bread (from Megan Paisley of Crane River Farm, yet again).

Both the basil and the shallots were used on Thursday, when I came home from a run to find a bunch of potatoes my hubby and kiddo dug up in the garden while I was gone.

The kiddo was so proud that he helped dig these potatoes!

The kiddo was so proud that he helped dig these potatoes! by Sarah Henning

The hubby turned them into a yummy potato salad topped with the basil and a Italian-style dressing made with a shallot. It was a totally yummy and welcome surprise, as I was starving from all that running!

Our garden potatoes and tomatoes mixed nicely with olives, green beans and CSA basil.

Our garden potatoes and tomatoes mixed nicely with olives, green beans and CSA basil. by Sarah Henning

And last, but not least, I finally managed to use my stored snap peas from weeks' past. We decided to pull out a lovely recipe by Nancy O'Connor of the famous "Rolling Prairie Cookbook." It's basically snap peas sauteed with shallots. And, boy, was it a winner! We had it for lunch on Saturday with some of Megan's focaccia (yes, I buy a LOT of bread from her, despite the fact that I bake my own).

Finally, on Saturday we got to enjoy our snap peas. And they were tasty!

Finally, on Saturday we got to enjoy our snap peas. And they were tasty! by Sarah Henning

Now, the little baby squashes replace the snap peas as the item in my fridge I need to use. Maybe I'll just do them up in a sauce pan with shallots just like the peas... hmmm.

Well, while I'm pondering that, here are the recipes for the potato salad and the snap peas.

Snap Peas with Shallots (From "The Rolling Prairie Cookbook by Nancy O'Connor"

1 tablespoon butter

1 large shallot, finely minced

4 cups snap peas, left whole, with strings and tips removed

1/4 teaspoon salt

2 to 3 tablespoons vegetable broth or water

Heat butter in a large skillet over medium-low heat. Add the shallot and sauté 2 to 3 minutes. Ad the peas, sprinkle with salt, and stir to coat with butter. Add liquid to the pan, cover and cook for 3 or 4 minutes more or until peas are barely tender-crisp and still bright green. Serve immediately. Serves 4.

Potato salad with Italian dressing (from BigOven.com)

1 cup cold water

2 teaspoons cornstarch

1/3 cup red-wine vinegar

1 tablespoon tomato paste

1 large clove garlic; peeled and minced

1 tablespoon country-style dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon dried basil; crushed

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano; crushed

1 pinch cayenne pepper

1/4 teaspoon salt

Freshly ground black pepper

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 pounds small red potatoes

1 medium shallot; peeled and minced

1/2 pound green beans; trimmed and cut

1/2 cup Kalamata olives

3 plum tomatoes; seeded and chopped (We used heirloom tomatoes)

8 basil leaves; slivered

1. To prepare the dressing: Combine about 1 tablespoon of the water with the cornstarch to dissolve. Combine the remaining water, cornstarch mixture, vinegar and tomato paste in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Continue boiling until slightly thickened. Remove from the heat and whisk in the garlic, mustard, basil, oregano, cayenne, salt, pepper and olive oil. Refrigerate at least 1 hour.

2. To prepare the salad: Scrub the potatoes but do not peel. Cut in halves. Place in a steamer basket and steam over boiling water until tender, about 20-25 minutes. Drain and transfer to a bowl. Add 4 tablespoons of the dressing and the shallot. Refrigerate 1 to several hours. Bring a small pan of water to the boil, add the beans and time about 5 minutes, or until tender. Drain and plunge into ice water to stop the cooking. Pat dry and add to the potatoes. Stir in the olives, tomatoes and basil leaves. Add enough dressing to coat the salad. If making the salad ahead, refrigerate; remove from refrigeration about 1 hour before serving.

So, what did we get this week? Blackberries, onions, zucchini, kale, new potatoes and tomatoes.

Tagged: Produce, Localvore, Cooking, Farmers Market, CSA, Rolling Prairie, Vegetables, Fruits, Farming, Locavore

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