Cottonwood honors U.S. Rep. Jenkins for helping to improve lives of people with disabilities

U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins received an AbilityOne Champion award Monday at Cottonwood Inc., 2801 W. 31st St. The award is given to lawmakers who have shown a commitment to improving the lives of Americans who have disabilities.

U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins received an AbilityOne Champion award Monday at Cottonwood Inc., 2801 W. 31st St. The award is given to lawmakers who have shown a commitment to improving the lives of Americans who have disabilities. by Richard Gwin

U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins received a special award Monday at Cottonwood Inc. for her advocacy on behalf of people with disabilities.

“She endorses and supports and advocates the work that we do,” said CEO Sharon Spratt during a brief ceremony. “She helps people who have severe disabilities to be able to have employment opportunities and to live full lives, and for that we are greatly appreciative.”

Cottonwood is a nonprofit organization that provides services, including employment, to individuals with developmental disabilities.

Spratt presented Jenkins, a Republican from the 2nd District, with the AbilityOne Champion award before about 100 Cottonwood employees and 30 guests, including board members and local dignitaries.

The award reflects Jerkins’ commitment to a U.S. Department of Defense contract to produce cargo tie-down straps for all branches of the military. The straps are used to move supplies, and Cottonwood is the sole producer of the straps.

Cottonwood has had the contract since 1999. It has been awarded in five-year increments.

“We hope it continues forever,” Spratt said.

Last year, Cottonwood produced a record 900,000 straps. Spratt said the contract provides jobs like sewing, labeling and packing for about 90 individuals.

“It helps them to earn a paycheck. It helps them to be able to afford to go on trips and do all of the fun things that all of us want to do. Plus, it enhances their self-esteem,” she said. “People who have a good, productive day and feel good about what they are doing are healthier, happier people — no matter whether they have a disability or not.”

Jenkins said she was “tickled” to be back at Cottonwood. She has toured the facility before. But it was the first time that the Cottonwood Choir performed for her. They sang “Home on the Range” and “America the Beautiful.”

“That was a real treat,” she said.

Jenkins said Congress is focusing on job creation and getting people back to work.

“You all are a great success story,” she said. “I am just so impressed with the way this place is operated and the support from the community and the good work that these men and women do on behalf of the American people.”

U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins, right, gives Cottonwood employee Diana Gates a hug after receiving an award Monday for her advocacy and work on behalf of people with disabilities.

U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins, right, gives Cottonwood employee Diana Gates a hug after receiving an award Monday for her advocacy and work on behalf of people with disabilities. by Richard Gwin

U.S. Lynn Jenkins shares a laugh with employees Monday at Cottonwood Inc., 2801 W. 31st St. She received the AbilityOne Champion award from Cottonwood for her commitment to improving the lives of Americans who have significant disabilities.

U.S. Lynn Jenkins shares a laugh with employees Monday at Cottonwood Inc., 2801 W. 31st St. She received the AbilityOne Champion award from Cottonwood for her commitment to improving the lives of Americans who have significant disabilities. by Richard Gwin

Tagged: Cottonwood Inc., disabilities

Comments

overthemoon 3 years, 3 months ago

I'd like to comment, but I"ve been told I can't any more. This article should be in the main news feed.

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mloburgio 3 years, 3 months ago

Rep. Lynn Jenkins and the republicans lied about medicare cuts. The Republican proposal would have adverse impacts on seniors and disabled individuals in the district who are currently enrolled in Medicare. It would: • Increase prescription drug costs for 9,300 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $92 million for drugs over the next decade. • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 111,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district. The Republican proposal would have even greater impacts on individuals in the district age 54 and younger who are not currently enrolled in Medicare. It would:

http://docs.house.gov/energycommerce/...

Maybe we need to start invading countries with cooler climates: The amount the U.S. military spends annually on air conditioning in Iraq and Afghanistan: $20.2 billion.

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