Posts tagged with Pt

Free Gait Analysis This Saturday!

Is there an injury in my future? Where do I have specific muscle weakness that if addressed will prevent a strain or sprain? Saturday morning, take a few minutes to have your run or walk stride video-analyzed by our physical therapy team. Doors open at 8:00am and we will run until noon. You can also enjoy free chair massages, talk with foot and ankle physician Dr. Waterman, hear from the running and shoe experts of Ad Astra running company, and enjoy coffee and snacks from J&S Coffee, t. Loft and the Merc!

1311 Wakarusa Drive #1000 Lawrence, KS www.therapyworkskansas.com 785-749-1300

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Running Injuries - Tools to Keep Going!

The race season is almost upon us! For seasoned runners and newcomers alike, now is the time to prepare for those 5K’s and beyond. Most running injuries tend to occur when people are returning to running, just getting started, increasing their distance, or attempting to increase their speed. In preparation for hitting the running trails, we at TherapyWorks have put together a list of running injuries and how to prevent them.

One of the most common injuries I see as a physical therapist is patellofemoral pain syndrome, commonly referred to as “runner’s knee”. With runner’s knee people will often have pain around their knee cap. In order to prevent such discomfort runners should assess their shoes for proper arch support and work to strengthen their glutes, hips, and quads. Rest time, icing, avoiding running downhill, and cross training are other ways to combat runner’s knee successfully.

Another common injury is shin splints, that achy pain in the front of your shins that has sidelined many a runner, but what numerous people do not know is that your hip flexors might be at fault.

As always shoe fit and proper support is important, along with cross training, rest, and ice, but strengthening your hip flexors is another good place to start your preparations for success.

Hamstring pain can also plague runners. If you have pain in the muscle at the back of your thigh and the pain was sudden, strong, and leaves the area with bruising you should consider consulting a medical professional. Hamstring tears may require extended rest, sometimes for months, before the runner is able to safely return to running. Chronic overuse injuries, which are less severe, generally require running at a slow and easy pace. In order to prevent this discomfort from ever befalling you, consider adding hamstring stretching and strengthening to your routine.

Next in the list of nagging injuries that can get between you and a good jog is IT band syndrome. Runners often get pain down the outside of their thighs from the hip to the knee if they suffer from weak hip musculature, namely abductors and glutes.

Another concern is proper arch support to prevent over-pronation at the foot. Exercises to strengthen the gluts and abductors, also stretches for the IT band, can help to get you back on the trails or assure that you never have to leave them.

Last, but certainly not the least, is plantar fasciitis. This a nasty pain that can show up in your heal during your first step of the morning or in your arch during your run. The plantar fascia covers the base of your foot from the heel to your toes and those without proper arch support, with tight calves, and/or with a weak core often fall prey to this nasty injury. Rolling a frozen water bottle under your feet, stretching your calves, wearing proper arch supports, and strengthening your core can all help to treat and prevent foot pain from getting in the way of your run.

In summary strengthening of both your legs and core is very important. Stretching is nonnegotiable if you want to be able to run for many years to come. If pain is preventing you from lacing up your tennis shoes, though, feel free to call TherapyWorks to schedule a free screen so we can assess if physical therapy is just the thing to get you back in action.

Megan Remmert, DPT TherapyWorks www.therapyworkskansas.com

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Resolution Re-energizers

As many people begin the new year with resolutions for a healthier lifestyle, it is important to remember frequency and intensity matter for seeing results. The CDC recommends adults participate in 2 different types of physical activity a week, aerobic activity and muscle strengthening. There are many ways to combine these 2 important types of activity into your schedule.

150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity every week AND muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups

75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity every week AND muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups

An equivalent mix of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity AND muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups There are many ways to perform aerobic activities and muscle-strengthening exercises.

Aerobic activity:

Moderate intensity: * Walking faster * Water aerobics * Riding a bike on level ground or with few hills * Doubles tennis * Pushing a lawn mower

Vigorous intensity * Jogging or running * Swimming laps * Riding a bike fast or on hills * Singles tennis * Playing basketball

Muscle strengthening: * Lifting weights * Working with resistance bands * Body weight * Resistance exercises * Heavy gardening * Yoga

Aerobic activity can be performed in 10 minutes increments at first to build up endurance to go longer. And it is important to always stretch properly before performing exercises and start off slowly if you are not used to exercise. And if you have an extreme tightness or muscle pain slowing you down, call TherapyWorks for a free screening for suggestions how physical therapy can get you back on track to your goals!

---Megan Remmert, DPT www.therapyworkskansas.com 785-749-1300

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2017 - Maybe Time For A New Approach to your Health Goals

Resolutions come and go, but changing up your health team may be a game changer. We've all heard about alternatives to Western medicine, but it's difficult to know exactly what route to explore. Integrative Medicine is "healing-oriented medicine that takes account of the whole person, including all aspects of lifestyle. It emphasizes the therapeutic relationship between practitioner and patient, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapies" according to the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine.

TherapyWorks invites you to learn more about Integrative and Functional Medicine on Thursday, January 19 at 7:00 p.m. Dr. Neela Sandal and Dr. Stephen Stevenson of Atma Clinic will share information about their new practice in downtown Lawrence and how it may help you meet new health goals. Items discussed will include their specialized lab services, unique nutritional analysis, the importance of the gut biome, and genetic factors. TherapyWorks PTA, Lee Tucker, will share how a physical therapy prescribed exercise program compliments directives from your doctor or mid-level provider.

This is a free Helping You Help Yourself Seminar open to the public. Contact TherapyWorks at 785-749-1300 or marketing@therapyworkskansas.com for more information - RSVP is requested.

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Physical Therapy Can Fix THAT?

I did not grow up wanting to be a physical therapist. When I was in kindergarten I wanted to be a doctor, nurse, dentist, or veterinarian, depending on which day you asked me. I only found and fell in love with physical therapy after tearing my ACL in high school soccer. Since my injury, and full recovery thanks to physical therapy, I have been deeply passionate about the field of physical therapy.

When I was going into physical therapy school I did not have a full understanding of what physical therapists could do. My limited understanding was that I would be able to help people walk, run, and return to their lives by becoming a physical therapist. The first revelation I had in physical therapy school was that PT’s treat wounds. While most of us do not treat wounds there are many PT’s who do. After getting out into more physical therapy clinics I was shocked to find PT’s effectively treating headaches, TMJ, vertigo, urinary leaks, fecal incontinence, plantar fasciitis, carpal tunnel, along with all the “normal” things I knew PT’s could treat: knee pain, back pain, ankle sprain, etc.

Now that I am out in the clinic as a physical therapist I consider it my great privilege to help people meet their goals, and I consider it my mission to get the word out about how physical therapy can help give people their lives back. Whether you are having leaks when you laugh, your little one has torticollis, you or a loved one are having falls, or you have back, neck, shoulder, hip, headaches, ankle, or foot pain know that there are physical therapists out there who can help.

If you have ever wondered if physical therapy could specifically help you TherapyWorks is having a free seminar in honor of National Physical Therapy Month on Wednesday, October 26 at 7:00pm.

--Sarah White-Hamilton, DPT of TherapyWorks www.therapyworkskansas.com

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Runner’s Clinic

Interested in knowing what a professional thinks about your running stride? Is there an injury waiting to happen if alignment is off? Are there strengthening and stretches that can get me ready for race season? Join us for our annual free Runner's Clinic on Saturday, February 13 from 8:00 to noon at TherapyWorks - 1311 Wakarusa Drive, Suite 1000. Therapists will video analyze your stride, and you can partake in stretch tables, chair massages, vendor booths, and refreshments! For more information call 749-1300 or visit our event page .

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Runners: Be prepared for race season

With racing season quickly approaching, it is important for all runners and walkers to be prepared. To best prepare for the season, it is important to avoid injury as you eagerly begin signing up for races. Some excellent ways to avoid injury prior to hitting the pavement and trails is to be sure you are well hydrated and fueling your body with healthy food choices. Make sure to mix in a combination of stretching and strengthening into your training regimen with an emphasis on core strengthening exercises. Also, be sure to cross-train and find the right pair of running/walking shoes to help support your body.

For many years, running and walking shoes have been organized into four categories: stability, motion-control, neutral-cushioned, and performance training. When considering what shoe is the “right one” for you, ask yourself a few questions….. What is my body frame? Your body frame tells you how much cushion your shoe needs to have. Do you prefer to feel a lot of padding under your feet when you run? This would indicate you want a running shoe with maximum cushioning. Or, perhaps you prefer to feel very close and in-touch to the ground, experiencing the more natural feel of a barefoot or minimalist running shoe that has little to no cushioning. When deciding on how much support your shoe needs, consider your arch type and flexibility of your anatomical arch. These two factors go hand-in-hand. There are three basic categories to anatomical foot arches: high arch/low flexibility, moderate arch/moderate flexibility, and lastly, low arch/high flexibility. The wet test is a quick and easy way to determine your arch type by simply dipping your foot in water or wet paint and then placing your wet foot on a piece of cardboard or concrete. Look for the classic "footprint in the sand" footprint. The footprint will reveal a noticeable curve inward, but not by more than 3/4 of an inch at its greatest part. If you see this kind of silhouette, then you have normal feet. Otherwise, check to see if the entire foot shows. Your footprint may look like a foot-shaped blob. There will be almost no inward curve from your big toe to your heel; there may even be an outward curve. This means that you have flat feet. If your footprint looks like neither, of these, then see if your footprint might curve inward, making the middle of your foot appear very skinny. Your toes and heel will show, but there is little in between. If this is the case, you most likely have a high arch foot. Below are shoe recommendations for each foot type:

• Normal Feet - Stability shoes offer a good balance of cushion and medial support which limits excessive inward rolling of the foot, which can cause injury. To provide stability, they provide a firmer density under the inner edge of your foot.

• Flat Feet - Motion control shoes are the most rigid, control-oriented running shoes. They're designed to slow down or limit extreme inward rolling of the foot and ankle, which can cause injury. They tend to be a heavier shoe, but are very durable.

• High Arched Feet - Cushioned shoes generally have the softest mid-soles and provide the least amount of stability. They’re usually built semi-curved or curved which encourages motion of the foot. These shoes are helpful for runners with rigid, immobile feet.

It is important to consult with an expert to help you find the best shoe to provide your body the support it needs during running and walking activities. Ideally the expert you consult will perform a gait analysis or a running analysis to determine the correct shoe for your walking and running technique. Just like tires on a vehicle wear out, so do your running and walking shoes. So be sure to regularly check and replace shoes as needed. Be sure to consult with an expert at a local shoe store to find your perfect shoe.

If you are concerned that you have sustained an injury during your training, or prior to beginning your training, do not hesitate to stop by TherapyWorks at 1311 Wakarusa and take five minutes to consult with a physical therapist for a “Free Screen” to determine if you would benefit from physical therapy services to get you back in the race.

Written By: Audrey Welch, PT

Free Runner's Clinic Saturday 2/28 from 9-noon at TherapyWorks 1311 Wakarusa Drive includes video gait analysis, free chair massages, information and refreshments!

Free Runner's Clinic Saturday 2/28 from 9-noon at TherapyWorks 1311 Wakarusa Drive includes video gait analysis, free chair massages, information and refreshments! by therapyworks

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Running Injuries - What You Need To Know

The race season is almost upon us! For seasoned runners and newcomers alike now is the time to prepare for the 5K’s and beyond. With the ups and downs of Kansas weather you can almost smell spring in the air. In preparation for hitting the running trails we at TherapyWorks have put together a list of running injuries and how to prevent them. Most running injuries tend to occur when people are returning to running, just getting started, increasing their distance, or attempting to increase their speed. One of the most common injuries I see as a physical therapist is patellofemoral pain syndrome, commonly referred to as “runner’s knee”. With runner’s knee people will often have pain around their knee cap. In order to prevent such discomfort runners should assess their shoes for proper arch support and work to strengthen their glutes, hips, and quads. Rest time, icing, avoiding running downhill, and cross training are other ways to combat runner’s knee successfully. Almost everyone has heard of shin splints, that achy pain in the front of your shins that has sidelined many a runner, but what numerous people do not know is that your hip flexors might be at fault. As always shoe fit and proper support is important, along with cross training, rest, and ice, but strengthening your hip flexors is another good place to start your preparations for success. Hamstring pain can also plague runners. If you have pain in the muscle at the back of your thigh and the pain was sudden, strong, and leaves the area with bruising you should consider consulting a medical professional. Hamstring tears may require extended rest, sometimes for months, before the runner is able to safely return to running. Chronic overuse injuries, which are less severe, generally require running at a slow and easy pace. In order to prevent this discomfort from ever befalling you, consider adding hamstring stretching and strengthening to your routine. Next in the list of nagging injuries that can get between you and a good jog is IT band syndrome. Runners often get pain down the outside of their thighs from the hip to the knee if they suffer from weak hip musculature, namely abductors and gluts. Another concern is proper arch support to prevent over-pronation at the foot. Exercises to strengthen the gluts and abductors, also stretches for the IT band, can help to get you back on the trails or assure that you never have to leave them. Last, but certainly not the least, is plantar fasciitis. This a nasty pain that can show up in your heal during your first step of the morning or in your arch during your run. The plantar fascia covers the base of your foot from the heel to your toes and those without proper arch support, with tight calves, and/or with a weak core often fall prey to this nasty injury. Rolling a frozen water bottle under your feet, stretching your calves, wearing proper arch supports, and strengthening your core can all help to treat and prevent foot pain from getting in the way of your run. In summary strengthening of both your legs and core is very important. Stretching is nonnegotiable if your want to be able to run for many years to come. If pain is preventing you from lacing up your tennis shoes, though, feel free to call TherapyWorks to schedule a free screen so we can assess if physical therapy is just the thing to get you back in action.

----Sarah White-Hamilton, DPT of TherapyWorks 1311 Wakarusa Drive, Lawrence, KS 66049 www.therapyworkskansas.com

Join us for our Free Seminar on February 18 at 7pm to hear more from one of our physical therapists and local physician and triathlete, Dr. Darin Elo.

Have your running gait video analyzed at our Runner's Clinic Saturday, February 28 from 9-noon and enjoy other health information booths, chair massages, snacks and more!

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Back Pain? We’ve Got Your Back!

Join us for a free seminar to learn more about how to treat and prevent back pain, an ailment that affects 80% of Americans.

Tuesday, October 29 from 7-8:00pm At TherapyWorks - 1311 Wakarusa Drive

More information at https://www.facebook.com/events/625288897493630/

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