Posts tagged with Lmh

Health services multiply economic contributions in Douglas County

Because of a ripple effect, for each job at Lawrence Memorial Hospital, another 0.59 job is created in Douglas County. Pictured are Sean Stubbs, Sonya Schinkel, Naa Britwum and Clifton Sims, who work on the fourth floor at LMH.

Because of a ripple effect, for each job at Lawrence Memorial Hospital, another 0.59 job is created in Douglas County. Pictured are Sean Stubbs, Sonya Schinkel, Naa Britwum and Clifton Sims, who work on the fourth floor at LMH.

This past week, staff at Lawrence Memorial Hospital joined hospitals across the country in celebrating National Hospital Week.

This annual observance recognizes the men and women who, day in and day out, remain committed to improving the health of their communities through compassionate care, constant innovation and unwavering dedication.

Celebrated since 1921 — which coincidentally was the year LMH was founded — National Hospital Week is a time dedicated to reinforcing the valuable contributions hospitals make in our communities.

In Kansas, LMH is one of 128 community hospitals that provide vital health care services 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Annually, Kansas hospitals staff nearly 12,000 beds; see more than 313,000 inpatients; assist in more than 39,000 births; provide care during more than 7.4 million outpatient visits; and treat more than 1.1 million patients in Kansas emergency departments.

Locally, at 173-bed LMH, last year staff saw 6,661 inpatients; assisted with 1,132 births; provided care during 160,733 outpatient visits; and treated 37,678 emergency patients. Not only do Kansas hospitals serve thousands of individuals, keeping our communities healthy, strong and vibrant, but hospitals also benefit the financial health of our state. As the fifth largest producer of total income and sales in the state, the Kansas health sector is a powerful economic force. In Kansas, hospitals employ more than 81,000 people or 4.3 percent of all job holders and generate $5.2 billion in direct total income.

A January 2014 report, entitled “The Importance of the Health Care Sector to the Kansas Economy,” produced by researchers at the Office of Local Government, K-State Research and Extension, estimated the “gross” impacts associated with the health care sector on economic activity in the state and locally by county.

The report identified three general areas of health care’s importance: health care attracts and retains business and industry; health care attracts and retains retirees; and health care creates jobs in the local economy.

According to the report, in 2011, the most recent year for which information was available, the health services sector accounted for an estimated 7.5 percent of total employment in Douglas County, or about 5,019 jobs. But the full impact goes beyond the number of people employed and the wages they receive. There is a secondary impact or “ripple effect” that comes from local businesses buying and selling to each other and from area workers spending their income for household goods and services. The ripple effect spreads the economic impact of the health sector through the county’s economy.

The report’s authors calculated economic multipliers for eight categories of health services and the total impact of the ripple effect on the Douglas County economy. For example, Lawrence Memorial Hospital employs 1,318 people and has an employment multiplier of 1.59. This means that for each job created at LMH, another 0.59 jobs are created in other businesses and industries in Douglas County. The direct impact of the 1,318 hospital employees results in an indirect impact of 779 jobs (1,318 x 0.59 = 779). Thus, the hospital had a total impact on area employment of 2,097 jobs.

Similarly, multiplier analysis can estimate the total impact on income and retail sales. The report estimated that health services accounted for more than $262 million in total income and about $95 million in retail sales in Douglas County. Of that amount, for every dollar of income generated in the hospital sector in Douglas County, another 43 cents is generated in other businesses and industries in the county’s economy.

Now more than ever, hospitals like LMH play a vital role in the community’s overall health.

The full statewide report and links to county reports can be found on the Kansas Hospital Association website at www.kha-net.org.

  • Janice Early is Vice President of Marketing and Communications for Lawrence Memorial Hospital. She can be reached at janice.early@lmh.org.
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Hearts of Gold Ball funding upgrades to inpatient rehab units

Renovations within the hospital not only improve facilities, they also increase the satisfaction of patients, their families and hospital staff. Some of the LMH associates who work on the fourth floor are Tiew Clippinger, Clifton Sims, Terri Kaiser, Pamela Wingert and Barb Hermreck.

Renovations within the hospital not only improve facilities, they also increase the satisfaction of patients, their families and hospital staff. Some of the LMH associates who work on the fourth floor are Tiew Clippinger, Clifton Sims, Terri Kaiser, Pamela Wingert and Barb Hermreck.

Lawrence Memorial Hospital recently was named one of the nation’s 100 Top Hospitals by Truven Health Analytics. This is the second year in a row that LMH received the honor. Truven Health Analytics conducts research studies, such as the 100 Top Hospitals study, with the goal of improving the cost and quality of health care.
A result of receiving this honor is that the community expects a higher quality of care from LMH. LMH is able to improve patient care because of support from the community.

One way that the community has helped support these improvements to LMH is through renovations, partially funded by the LMH Endowment Association’s biannual Hearts of Gold Ball.

Every other year a different area of the hospital is chosen to benefit from the Hearts of Gold Ball. The 2012 gala raised $350,000 to help finance renovations of the hospital’s 2-North medical unit, where many critically ill patients are treated.

Renovations within the hospital not only improve facilities but also increase the satisfaction of patients, their families and the hospital staff. The second floor has seen this effect since its renovation. “Hearts of Gold impacted the unit incredibly,” says Deborah Rector, director of 2-North. “It is so meaningful for our patients to have a private, therapeutic area where they can rest and heal and can have peaceful moments with their families.”

It is hoped this year’s Hearts of Gold Ball will have the same impact on the fourth floor, the designated beneficiary. The fourth floor is home to two important hospital programs: the acute rehabilitation unit and the transitional care unit, which also is known as skilled nursing. Both focus on patient rehabilitation.

Planned renovations for the fourth floor will include transforming patient rooms to private rooms, moving the dining room and ensuring it has a more home-like atmosphere, and constructing a new family- and patient-gathering area.

Teresa Kaiser, the fourth floor director, said, “The renovation of the fourth floor will help fulfill the community’s expectations for a Top 100 Hospital, and this much-needed upgrade is an investment in the future. If fourth floor receives these needed renovations, both the ARU and TCU programs will better serve patients’ needs in an environment that enhances their comfort, privacy and convenience.”

The 2014 Hearts of Gold Ball is May 10 at the Lawrence Journal-World’s former press building on the 600 block of New Hampshire Street. The theme, “Press On,” is a nod to the ball’s location and reminds the community of the mindset that fourth floor patients must have to persevere as they rehabilitate and heal. Last year, patients spent a total of 6,256 days pressing on toward rehabilitation.

Kathy Clausing-Willis, LMH vice president and chief development officer, said, “We provide world-class care on the fourth floor. We just need the facilities to be able to improve the patient experience.”

Linda Robinson, a co-chair of this year’s fundraising event, said, “The Hearts of Gold Ball is a special way to spend a magical evening of fun and food with friends and colleagues, but more importantly it is a way to help LMH. The proceeds help to enhance and improve upon the services and facilities available to our community.”

To support the renovation of the fourth floor and help LMH maintain its status as one of the Truven Health 100 Top Hospitals, contact Tracy Davidson, development specialist at the LMH Endowment Association, at 505-3318 or tracy.davidson@lmh.org, or visit lmhendowment.org.

  • Margo Bogossian, a Kansas University senior, is an intern for the LMH Endowment Association.
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LMH trustees devoted to quality care

Serving as an Lawrence Memorial Hospital Trustee is not all business, as Cindy Yulich and Allen Belot can attest. In addition to volunteering an average of 20 hours a month in meetings, sometimes trustees get to have a little fun, like judging the LMH Holiday Cookie Contest.

Serving as an Lawrence Memorial Hospital Trustee is not all business, as Cindy Yulich and Allen Belot can attest. In addition to volunteering an average of 20 hours a month in meetings, sometimes trustees get to have a little fun, like judging the LMH Holiday Cookie Contest.

From caring for patients to ensuring the facilities are well maintained to dealing in matters of high finance, it takes a lot of people to run a hospital. But it may surprise many to know that Lawrence Memorial Hospital’s governing board is made up of community volunteers.

Since its inception in 1921, LMH has relied on the guidance of its Board of Trustees to set policies and make decisions that shape the future of health care in Lawrence and Douglas County. The board ultimately has the fiduciary responsibility for the hospital. Nine volunteers meet monthly to strategize about such issues as expansion of services and quality of care. In addition to monthly meetings, each board member serves on various committees that also meet regularly to work on behalf of key functions of the hospital.

Currently led by Chairperson Allen Belot, a Lawrence architect, these generous and highly qualified professionals choose to devote time and talent to help LMH navigate important issues and decisions in the best interest of the community.

Belot says that because LMH is self-funded from its operations and receives no tax support from the City of Lawrence or Douglas County, it’s important to help serve the community’s health care needs as a member of the board.

Appointed by the mayor and confirmed by the Lawrence City Commission, the trustees serve four-year terms. When a vacancy occurred in 2005, Belot jumped at the opportunity.

“My father was a physician at LMH for 50 years,” Belot said. “I have a special place in my heart for our community hospital.” Recent years have brought dramatic changes in growth and expansion at LMH, making the work of the Board of Trustees more challenging than ever.

Having a background in health care or a hospital-related field is not required. New trustees attend a formal orientation, and all trustees participate in ongoing education to stay current with changes facing the health care industry. Each brings a unique skill set that enhances the board as a whole. Those skills include a history of achievement, ability to work in a team-oriented environment, and philanthropy and governance experience.

The trustees also contribute personal attributes such as compassion, independence, intelligence, integrity and objectivity. Each volunteers an average of 20 or more hours per month in committee meetings, education and community meetings and regular monthly board meetings where decisions are made.

Gina Pacumbaba-Watson, now in her third year as a trustee, feels it is an honor. Her experience as an owner of a Lawrence engineering and consulting firm is important, as she leads the facilities committee and serves on the human resources and credentials committees.

“Our role is to bring opinions and insight from the community to allow the staff to make informed, precise decisions,” she says. LMH President and CEO Gene Meyer said, “In my years at LMH I have been very fortunate to work with board members who are committed to what we are trying to accomplish here. Their dedication, insights and support have really contributed to LMH being one of the 100 Top Hospitals in the country.”

In addition to Belot and Pacumbaba-Watson, members of the LMH Board of Trustees are Vice Chairperson Mike Wildgen, Treasurer Rob Chestnut, Jane Blocher, John Bullock, Dr. Lee Reussner, John Ross, Cindy Yulich, and Dr. Eric Huerter, chief of staff, an ex officio member.

The LMH Board of Trustees meets monthly at 9 a.m. the third Wednesday of the month in the hospital auditorium. Meetings are open to the public.

  • Janice Early is Vice President of Marketing and Communications for Lawrence Memorial Hospital. She can be reached at janice.early@lmh.org. Christy Moore contributed to this article.
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Internal Medicine Group recognized for patient-centered care

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The Internal Medicine Group of Lawrence recently was recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. The Internal Medicine Group earned recognition as a Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home for adopting and demonstrating evidence-based processes to coordinate patient care. Level 3 is the highest level of recognition.

The Patient-Centered Medical Home is a model of care that is comprehensive, team-based, coordinated, accessible and focused on quality and safety.

The NCQA Patient-Centered Medical Home Recognition program identifies practices that promote partnerships between individual patients and their personal clinicians, rather than treating patient care as the sum of episodic office visits. Each patient’s care is delivered by clinician-led care teams that provide all health care needs and coordinate treatment across the health care system.

According to the NCQA, the Patient-Centered Medical Home is a way of organizing primary care that emphasizes care coordination and communication to transform primary care into "what patients want it to be." That means:

• Patients have long-term partnerships with clinicians, not a series of sporadic, hurried visits.

• Clinician-led teams coordinate care, especially for prevention and chronic conditions.

• Medical homes coordinate other clinicians’ care and community supports, as needed.

• Medical homes offer enhanced access through expanded hours and online communication.

• They promote shared decisions, so patients make informed choices and get better results.

Dr. Greg Schnose of the Internal Medicine Group noted that the practice always has strived to provide patient-centered care, and that has not changed. 

“During our journey towards NCQA recognition, as we evaluated ‘what we do’ we did find opportunities to enhance the care we provide, and we implemented change,” he said. 

The NCQA looks at how medical home clinicians demonstrate the benchmarks of patient-centered care, including open scheduling, expanded hours and appropriate use of proven health information systems.

Dr. Schnose said: “Using the electronic health record we also were able to measure with hard data our performance in management of chronic health conditions. I am quite pleased with our care team’s performance when compared to available national benchmarks.”

To receive NCQA recognition, which is valid for three years, the Internal Medicine Group demonstrated the ability to meet the program’s key elements, which include:

• Written standards for patient access and continuity of care

• Appropriate use of charting tools to track patients and organize clinical information

• Responsive care management techniques with an emphasis on preventive care for individual patients and for the entire patient population

• Adaptation to patients’ cultural and linguistic needs

• Use of information technology for prescriptions, test and referral tracking, and coordination with other health care providers

• Use of evidence-based guidelines to treat chronic conditions

• Measurement and reporting of clinical and service performance

The Internal Medicine Group is a multi-specialty practice that has served patients in the Lawrence area since 1979. Internal medicine physicians practicing with the group are Dr. Gerald Pees, Dr. Greg Schnose, Dr. Richard Sosinski, Dr. Kevin Stuever, Dr. Molly Imber and Dr. Anna Kumru, joined by nurse practitioner Karen Roberts. Also practicing at the Internal Medicine Group are Dr. Teresa King, a gastroenterologist, and Dr. Chris Penn, an infectious disease specialist. In Lawrence, the Health Care Access Clinic also has been recognized by NCQA as a Level 2 Patient-Centered Medical Home.

  • To learn more about the Internal Medicine Group’s recognition and watch a video about the concept, visit www.lmh.org/internalmedicinegroup and click the Patient-Centered Medical Home page or visit the NCQA website at www.ncqa.org. Janice Early is vice president of marketing and communications for Lawrence Memorial Hospital. For more info, email janice.early@lmh.org.
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